Tag Archives: cowl

U-S-A!

I have caught the Olympics fever big time this year. This past weekend, I did little more than drink coffee, binge-watch Olympic events, and of course, knit non-stop.

It’s important to have good knitting and tv companions. Charli is a big fan of the snowboarding half-pipe.

Ralph Lauren designed the closing ceremony knitwear and outfits for US Olympic team members, including this spectacular stranded hat. I’ve already seen some incarnations of this over on Ravelry.

Image result for us olympic ski hat
credit: Ralph Lauren

It’s a great hat. I love the balance of color and the jaunty double tassel thing that’s going on at the top. But stranded knitting can be intimidating and also time consuming. If colorwork is your cup of tea (confession: it’s mine!), then I would recommend these colors in Deluxe DK Superwash for your take on this hat:

838 Twilight
837 Christmas Red
828 Pulp

But if you’re in the mood for a simpler project with just as much patriotic bang for your buck, how about the USA Hat & Cowl in Uptown Bulky Amplify:

U-S-A U-S-A

With just one skein of self-striping Amplify you can make this  patriotic hat and cowl set. And on size 11 needles, this set goes so quickly you could make this project several times over before the closing ceremonies next weekend.

What’s on your needles this week as you cheer on your country?

Free Pattern Friday – Porthole Cowl

My friends, winter is showing no signs of letting up, even here in North Carolina. We were blasted with 5-6″ of snow the other day. If you’re from a northern state as I am, that may not seem like much. But in the south it is a significant amount and is cause for much celebration and hot cocoa. And as we all know, any reason to pile on more knitwear is quite welcome.

Our free pattern this week is the Porthole Cowl, knit in a soft wintery shade of self-shading Major.

Pattern link here.

This cowl is knit in the round, showing off the shading of Major as it works it’s way upward in a bounty of texture and “porthole” lace. The color is quite subtle in color 118 Silver Blush. If you like more in-your-face-color, there are many options to choose from. Some of my favorites are:

112 Firecracker
131 Egg Hunt (a brand new colorway!)
102 Underwater

Happy crafting – stay warm out there!

Free Pattern Friday – Hanasaku Cowl (Crochet)

It’s Free Pattern Friday!

Today, it’s the crochet version of the Hanasaku Cowl, in Classic Shades Frenzy and Bamboo Bloom Handpaints (pattern link here).

We had a lot of requests for this!  The original knitted Hanasaku Cowl (free from your  LYS or for sale via Ravelry) was a very popular design, so it’s only fair that the crocheters get to take a crack at it too.

The long version of the cowl is shown, calling for two skeins of Bamboo Bloom Handpaints and two of Classic Shades Frenzy.  The pattern also includes instructions for the short version, which takes just one skein of each.

Classic Shades Frenzy is slightly bulkier than the Poems called for in the knit version, but you could easily substitute it or regular Classic Shades for the Frenzy – it’s all about whatever colors speak to you.

We used our very newest Bamboo Bloom Handpaints color, 328 Sango, with Frenzy color 915 Madras.  We were happy to see how the reds, blues, and blacks played off each other so dramatically.

For myself, one of my resolutions is to get better at crochet (so far, so good!) so I’m looking at giving this one-piece cowl a whirl.  The advantage of working at Universal is having a ton of beautiful yarn to look at – what do you think of Bamboo Bloom Handpaints 313 Kanji and Classic Shades Frenzy 909 Attic Light?  Although that 914 Botanica just peeking out behind it is also awfully nice.  Decisions, decisions.

Your LYS would have some great ideas on color combos for you to put together.

We hope you enjoy this colorful crochet cowl.  Have a fantastic weekend.

Happy crafting!

Day 12 of Winter

For the last installment of our blog series on our 12 Days of Winter Kit Collection, we’re unveiling the Twining Vines Cowl Twining Vines features Amphora. It is a perfect yarn for colorwork because its gorgeous halo blends the fibers together seamlessly. The effect is almost like an impressionist painting.

In addition to carrying two colors throughout this pattern, you’ll also need to trap your floats. It’s simpler than you might think. This tutorial is useful for any stranded project. If you’d like a closer look at the images, simply click on them.

Notice the large number of white stitches between the blue stitches. This is an area you’ll want to “trap” or “catch” your float to prevent any snagging.
Begin by knitting across your row as usual. Continue until you reach the section that requires trapping a float. Usually, an area that requires trapping floats will have more than five stitches.
As a rule of thumb, I trap my floats every five stitches. I’ve knit across four stitches, and I will trap my float on the fifth stitch.
Simply place your non-working yarn over the right-hand needle, but do not knit with it.
Wrap your working yarn around the right-hand needle to knit. Make sure your non-working yarn (the blue yarn) is over the needle and the working yarn (the white yarn).
Begin to knit the stitch. Notice how I’m holding the blue yarn. It is still above the white yarn, but it is not wrapped around the right-hand needle. Take care not to pull the non-working  (blue) yarn through the stitch. 
Knit the stitch. As you can see, the blue yarn is still at the back of the work. You can continue knitting as usual after this. That’s really how simple it is!
When you peek at the wrong side of your work, you’ll be able to see where you trapped the float. Notice the blue bump in the middle of the white stitches? That is where I’ve trapped the blue yarn underneath the white yarn.

Just like that, we’ve released all 12 of the patterns featured in our 12 Days of Winter Collection. We sincerely hope you’ve been enjoying our blog series highlighting each pattern. You can find the Twining Vines kit on our website here.

Now that you’ve seen them all, I’d also like to emphasize that tomorrow is Small Business Saturday. What better way to show your support for your local yarn shop than by stopping by to pick up one of our kits on Small Business Saturday?

Day 10 of Winter

On Day 10 of Winter, we bring to you the Templetop Revisited Hat and Cowl set.

Oh, how I adore stranded knitting in our Deluxe DK Tweed! Crisp, defined colorwork has its place. But when the yarn has more character like our tweed, it softens the lines of the patterning and gives more interest.

This title of this design has the caveat of “revisited” because the original Templetop Cowl indeed exists. The first incarnation of this design was knit in Amphora, another yarn with one of my favorite characteristics: halo.

With smooth, plied yarns, knitting is crisp, even, and predictable. But when a yarn has a special characteristic such as tweedy bits or loft, stitches are less cut and dry and more organic. They have a mind of their own, so to speak. And they become more like real life, too, where we can’t always control things down to every last detail. There is a level of relief that comes with that acceptance, where we just let things be how they’re going to be, and this is ultimately why I love yarns with character. They mirror our own lives in ways that we might not realize at first.

Golly, you never knew yarn and knitting could get so philosophical, right? You can find the Templetop Revisited kit on our website here.

 

Free Pattern Friday – Tiltawhirl Cowl

It’s Free Pattern Friday!

Today, the Tiltawhirl Cowl in Classic Shades Frenzy (link here).

I have to say, as its creator, I’m feeling pretty good about today’s Free Pattern Friday.  It was incredibly easy – just knits and purls – but you’d never know it to look at it.  For that, credit goes to the yarn, Classic Shades Frenzy.

a ball of multi-colored yarn with a label reading CLASSIC SHADES FRENZY.

a closeup of a diagonally ribbed purple knitted fabric

It’s a thick yarn with enough variation in color to give a simple design additional interest.

This cowl uses a diagonal rib pattern.  The beauty of doing this in the round is that if you wish, you can simply cast on the required number and k2p2 all the way around every row until you’ve reached the desired width of your cowl.  This took just one ball, and it made a cowl long enough to wear loose or to wrap once for extra warmth.

For mindless knitting, I tend to favor simple designs on big needles that I can work on while chatting or watching TV, and this fits the bill.  Now that the weather’s turned, this would be a great knit-night project!

Have a wonderful weekend, and be sure to make time for yourself.

Happy crafting!

Free Pattern Friday – Collar Cowl in Major

It’s Free Pattern Friday!

Today, the Collar Cowl in Major (pattern link).

Don’t you love it when a yarn does half the work for you?  Self-striping Major makes this knitting project super colorful.

This collar cowl is perfect as an extra layer just beneath your coat during blustery winter days. The cowl is worked in the round from the bottom-up with shaping intended to perfectly hug the neck and shoulders. The result is an especially warm accessory.

Worked in bulky-weight Major, this cowl is also a quick knit. Since one skein is enough for two cowls, why not make one for yourself and another as a gift for someone special?

We hope you have a fantastic weekend.  Happy knitting!