Tag Archives: DK

Free Pattern – Cancer Comfort Cap

We are proud to share this free pattern with you, although we wish there were no reason to do so.

This is the Cancer Comfort Cap in Cotton Supreme DK (pattern link here).

We designed this cap at the request of Yonca, our sales director.  When she requested this cap, it was for a friend who is about to undergo chemotherapy for breast cancer.  Unfortunately, since then, another friend of hers has also been diagnosed.  According to breastcancer.org, 1 in 8 American women will develop invasive breast cancer in the course of her lifetime (as well as 1 in 1000 men).  This is a disease that hits close to home.

Yonca wanted to write something for her friend to add to this post, but she finally had to admit defeat. She felt that everything she wanted to say was inadequate.  In the face of a life-changing diagnosis, it can be hard to find the words to express our pain and love.  But just reaching out to say “I’m here, I’m with you,” can sometimes be enough.

We offer this hat as a way to say “I’m with you” when words won’t quite do the trick.  It’s knitted in the round in our Cotton Supreme DK, which we picked because it’s very soft, and chemo scalps can be quite sensitive – something to keep in mind when choosing yarn.

If you have questions about breast cancer detection and treatment, the American Cancer Society has a helpful page.  Mammogram guidelines can also be found at CancerCare.org.

To all of our generous-hearted crafting friends, we wish you good health and every happiness.

Free Pattern Friday – Almas Poncho

It’s Free Pattern Friday!

Today, the Almas Poncho in Deluxe DK Tweed Superwash (link here).

Fall is upon us, and we felt the need for something toasty!

Almas is knit seamlessly in the round from the top down. It can act as a shoulder/bust warmer for a brisk walk in the woods, or can be scrunched up and worn as a cowl paired with your favorite winter coat.  We like the rustic quality that Deluxe DK Tweed Superwash gives this cozy piece.

As a short poncho or capelet, it can be worn collar up or down, as you wish.

With just a touch of stranded knitting, this project is a nice introduction to the Fair Isle method of changing colors in your work.

We hope you have a delightful weekend.

Happy knitting!

Halos of Hope – Healing Vibes

One of the nice things about going to crafting shows is that we get to see in person how generous our crafting community can be.  We were reminded of this again with the Halos for Hope booth at StitchesWest.

Halos of Hope partners with LYSes and local guilds to collect and distribute chemo caps.   These caps are practical, and also serve as a personal reminder to a person going through a difficult time that yes, they are cared for.

We were moved to design new patterns for our Cotton Supreme family, which is a great choice for chemo caps.  It’s incredibly soft and won’t irritate chemo patients’ scalps, which are often more tender than usual.

Amy Gunderson brings us our first offering, Healing Vibes in Cotton Supreme DK.

Amy says she thinks of this as a knitted representation of rays of radiation zapping cancer away.  Such a lovely idea – meaningful, but still very pretty in its own right.  We hope someone wearing this will feel the strength and energy Amy has put into this design.

This pattern has a bit of personal significance to me.  It was released on the 9th anniversary of the day my mother was declared free of ovarian cancer.  Mom has had no recurrence – she’s still energetic enough to run rings around me.   She’d be the first to tell you to know the signs, and to go see your doctor if you have any concerns.  I, for one, am very glad that she took early action.

If you’d like to l earn more about Halos of Hope, their website has info.  Their Facebook page is also chock full of patterns and ideas.

We hope that you enjoy this free pattern, and that while you take care of those around you, you take care of yourself, too.

Happy and healthy knitting!

Sewing Moto Jackets

Finally, after sampling for my fabric (and getting a cool scarf in the process),

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warping 280 inches of 432 ends,

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and weaving the actual fabric

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it was time to sew jackets!

The first step was to interface all of my handwoven fabric. I got enough lightweight fusible interfacing for all my yardage. The reason for doing this is so that when I cut into the fabric for my pattern pieces, it will prevent the edges from coming unwoven.

Two jackets-worth of pattern pieces and lining is a LOT of cutting!

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Every bit of fabric is precious since I wove it, so a certain strategy is involved when laying out those pattern pieces.

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With the interfacing on the back of my fabric, it made it easy to make pattern markings and actually be able to see them.

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I used a special foot on my sewing machine called a “walking foot” for some of the bulky seams. It helps to manage bulky layers of fabric so that they feed evenly through the machine.

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Sewing moto jackets requires a lot of coffee.

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Since this is a weaving column, I’m taking it easy on sharing every single detail of the sewing process. But zipper installation fascinates me, so here are some in-progess shots of the pocket zippers. Above, I’m sewing the lining onto the right side of the fabric.

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Then the pocket opening is slashed down the center.

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Next, the lining fabric gets pulled to the wrong side and pressed. It’s so clean and tidy looking!

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And finally the zipper is pinned underneath and sewn down. I love a good zipper installation. Which is good, since each jacket requires 5 zippers. Whew!

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Here we have something that is actually beginning to resemble clothing. Yay!

It's like magic that this can turn into a moto jacket, right?
It’s like magic that this can turn into a moto jacket, right?

 

If you’re planning on being at TNNA in San Jose this weekend, stop by the booth and check out the finished jackets. Otherwise, I’ll be back on the blog next week for final photos and wrap-up.

 

Free Pattern Friday – Storytime Cardi

It’s Free Pattern Friday!

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Today, the Storytime Cardi in Deluxe DK Tweed Superwash.

Is it storytime, then?  I think it is!

dw-tweed-and-dk-stacked-100Once upon a time, there was a yarn named Deluxe DK Tweed Superwash.  It was just a bit smaller than its big sibling, Deluxe Worsted Tweed Superwash.  DK wondered, “What can people make with me?  I’m littler than you are!”

And DW answered, “Ah, but you’re just right for so many things!  Lots of people want a littler yarn for littler people!”  And DW was right!  People did want DK for kid projects.

Continue reading Free Pattern Friday – Storytime Cardi

Free Pattern Friday – Sizzle Scarf

It’s Free Pattern Friday!

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Today, the Sizzle Scarf in Uptown DK.

We love this!  So bright and summery.  Two balls of Uptown DK (273yds/100g) in 139 Bright Salmon makes this long crescent-shaped scarf.  As fun as this is in one color, can you imagine it in two? It’s knit from the bottom up, so how about switching to a second shade after working the leaf lace?

We hope you have a great weekend, and make every pattern you touch your own.

Happy knitting!

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Free Pattern Friday – Paprika Seed Cowl

It’s Free Pattern Friday!

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Today, the Paprika Seed Cowl in Uptown DK Colors.

This one is actually my design, and it started as an experiment.  I was curious to see how the stripes in Uptown DK Colors (273yds/100g) would work in a really long row.  The answer – great!

Uptown DK Colors Seed Stitch Cowl long blogThis could not be easier.  There are actually two possible ways of knitting this one-skein cowl.

One is as written in the pattern: cast on an even number (192), place a marker, join for knitting in the round, and then alternate rounds of *k1, p1* and *p1, k1*.  Bind off after 5″, or whatever width floats your boat.

The other, which you may find even simpler, is to cast on an odd number (191), join for knitting in the round, and then just *k1, p1* continuously around until the piece is as wide as you want it to be.

I had enough yarn left over to do a few more color repeats, had I chosen to keep going.  This would be a great project for a beginner, or for anyone who wants something they can pick up and set down without worrying about where they are in the pattern.

We hope you have a relaxing weekend, with plenty of time to work on the project of your choice.

Happy knitting!

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