Tag Archives: jacket

Free Pattern Friday – Cardinal Jacket

It’s Free Pattern Friday!

Today, the Cardinal Jacket in Major.

We love this versatile piece not just for its great use of self-shading bulky Major (328yds/200g) but also for its easy construction.

This cozy open front cardigan is knit sideways.  Essentially, you’ll be knitting a big rectangle, binding off on one row and casting back on on the next to make holes for the arms. Sleeves are knit flat, joined to the armhole openings, and then seamed.

The stitch pattern is a twelve-row repeat called Shifting Horseshoes.  It’s both written and charted. The fabric has a subtle wave, and it’s not too hard to read your stitches once you’re in the groove of knitting it.

Add a closure if you wish, or wear it open, or gather it with a shawl pin.  It’s a versatile piece.

We hope you enjoy this loose and lovely cardi!

Happy knitting!

Thanks for the shawl pin, JUL Designs!

Rocking Moto Jackets

You can read through the entire tale of the moto jackets on previous blog posts here, here, here, and here.  It took a few near all-nighters, but the moto jackets got finished by my goal of TNNA last weekend. Yay!

Here are myself and Yonca wearing them in the booth:

I love Yonca's choice of red zippers!
I love Yonca’s choice of red zippers!

For those who aren’t familiar with TNNA, it stands for “The National Needlearts Association” and is our industry trade show. The winter show took place in San Jose just this past weekend. It’s an opportunity for our LYS customers to swing by our booth and see all our new yarns, colors, and designs. We love meeting customers in person – thanks to everyone who attended!

After returning from our long weekend, Heather kindly snapped some detail shots of the jackets.

Each jacket has 5 zippers - that was 10 total zippers to shorten. Whew!
Each jacket has 5 zippers – that was 10 total zippers to shorten. Whew!
My pop of color is on the inside of my jacket in the form of teal lining. Mmmm.
My pop of color is on the inside of my jacket in the form of teal lining. Mmmm.
I really do love this pattern complete with details like these pleats. They're both stylish and functional, allowing for ease of movement in the back and shoulder area of the wearer.
I really do love this pattern that includes details like these pleats. They’re both stylish and functional, allowing for ease of movement in the back and shoulder area of the wearer.

 

The gray contrast fabric at the waistband, elbow patches, and a few other locations is a wool blend that was purchased.
The gray contrast fabric at the waistband, elbow patches, and a few other locations is a wool blend that was purchased.
It's amazing what a difference the details can make!
It’s amazing what a difference the details can make!

Yonca Jacket full blog

Next time, I’m going to be back at the rigid heddle loom with some of our Ready to Dye yarn and some experimentation!

Free Pattern Friday – Peony Ridge Jacket

It’s Free Pattern Friday!

peony-ridge-jacket-adore-blog

Today, the Peony Ridge Jacket in Adore Colors.

Self-striping yarn looks so cute in baby knits!  It’s a great way to add color without complicating the design.  Adore Colors is a great choice for this, and it doesn’t hurt that it’s a soft, machine washable blend of our anti-pilling acrylic and superwash merino.  Lucky baby.  Well, not just baby – this jacket is sized up to 6 years.

adore-colors-3-shot-square-blog

Work the cardi from the bottom up in one piece until you get to the yoke. Sleeves are worked flat to the yoke. Then join the sleeves and the body and work upward.  You’ll want three or four buttons, depending on size.  There’s one button hidden under the collar, so you can fasten it closed around the neck in case of really cold weather.

We hope you enjoy this cute little jacket – and that you and yours stay warm!

Happy knitting!

peony-ridge-jacket-adore-closeup-blog

Warping for Herringbone Moto Jackets

After my successful sampling with my herringbone scarf a couple of weeks ago, I got set to wind a much larger warp – enough to make fabric for two moto jackets. I neglected to get photos of the warping process. I used the warping board I’ve shared photos of on this blog before. And this warp was so long, I almost didn’t have enough warping pegs!

Here are the specs for this giant piece of fabric I’m about to weave:

  • Yarn: Deluxe DK Superwash
    • Warp color: 414 Charcoal, 13 balls
  • Reed: 12 dent
  • Weaving width: 36″, 432 ends
  • Length of warp: 280″

My pattern calls for 2 1/4 yds of 55″ wide fabric. Because my loom has a maximum width of 36″, I had to do a few calculations in order to get the total square yardage I need. What I came up with was a really long warp!

280" of tweedy goodness.
280″ of tweedy goodness.

432 ends means 432 heddles to thread. And then, 432 ends to feed through the reed. Whew!

warping_2

When I’m threading the reed, I like to do it 4 ends at a time. I take my left hand and grasp the next 3 ends as shown below, holding my hand behind the reed.

It's important to make sure the ends coming from the heddles go into the reed in the correct order.
It’s important to make sure the ends coming from the heddles go into the reed in the correct order.

Then I feed the next end from my left hand and grab it with my threading hook. It’s a good way for me to stay organized during this process.

Opposable thumbs are really awesome.
Opposable thumbs are really awesome.

Tying onto the front apron rod means I’m almost ready to weave!

Gotta be evenly tense here.
Gotta be evenly tense here.

I’m just getting started here. Once I’ve woven this giant piece of fabric, it’s onto jacket making. And this project is going to go quickly since my deadline is next month’s TNNA show. Stay tuned!

 

 

Free Pattern Friday – Loft Jacket

It’s Free Pattern Friday!

Allore Loft Jacket_blog

Today, the Loft Jacket in Allore.

Allore 101 Nero hi-res
Allore Color 101 Nero

Allore (109yds/50g) is new for Rozetti Yarns this season, and we love it.  It’s light and lofty, with a brushed, slightly fuzzy appearance.  But what takes it to the next level is a) it’s got lovely gradations in shade, and b) glitter!  A metallic strand running through it makes it easy to make instant “dress up” pieces. Working on a US 9-11 needle means knits go fast.

This jacket is worked flat from the bottom up and then seamed.  Regularly spaced twists give it just the right amount of texture.  Add buttonholes at the collar or secure it with a pin, as we’ve done here.

I love this jacket.  What a great mix of cozy and elegant.

Happy knitting!

Throwback Thursday – Winter Afternoon Sweater Jacket

It’s Throwback Thursday!

TT Winter Afternoon Sweater Jacket_blog

Luxury!  The Winter Afternoon Sweater Jacket was originally made in our Dolce Merino 50% fine merino/50% microfiber blend.  Sadly, Dolce Merino is discontinued, but we have several DK weight yarns that this garment would look great in.

First, Uptown DK 100% anti-pilling acrylic.  As you can see in the (free) Green Lace Scarf pattern at right, it holds cables well, making it a good choice.  We frequently recommend this for baby knits since it’s machine washable and durable, but it’s also a smart pick for adult garments that you want to last a long time.  Personally, if I’m going to invest time into knitting a jacket, I want to be able to show it off well into the future.

Next, Merino XF Superwash.  This is another one that is machine washable and sturdy.  As the XF in the name implies, it’s extrafine merino, so softness is not a problem.

Finally, Deluxe DK Superwash.  As seen in the popular free Wishing Cowl pattern at right, it’s another great choice for cables.  And again, it’s long-lasting and machine washable.

The Winter Afternoon Sweater Jacket is knit flat in the traditional style.  This would be a cozy project to spread out and knit on your lap on a cool night.  Lovely to make and to wear during brisk weather.

Happy knitting!