Tag Archives: scarf

Free Pattern Friday – Chapel Stole

It’s Free Pattern Friday!

Today, the Chapel Stole in Radiant Cotton.

Depending on where you are, either it’s warm enough for Spring projects, or you’re dreaming that it’s warm enough.  It’s time to get a little headstart with this beautiful lace wrap.

Knit on US Size 7 (4.5mm) needles in Radiant Cotton (203yds/100g),  it’s a generous 84″ (seven feet!) as shown.  It would be easy to lengthen or shorten – just add or remove a repeat or two from the central section.  The crocheted picot edging is applied after finishing the piece.

This lovely sampler also comes in a narrower scarf version at about half the width.

There are some really bright Spring colors in Radiant cotton that would look lovely with this.  Maybe 819 Sky Blue?

Or maybe something lighter and more delicate, like 807 First Bloom.

It’s a good feeling to be spoiled for choice.

Happy knitting!

Free Pattern Friday – Suddenly, Gradiently!

It’s Free Pattern Friday!

Today, it’s Suddenly, Gradiently! in Deluxe Bulky Superwash.

We loved the way this simple color-changing scarf looked, so we knitted up several options to see how it looked in different colors. It was no hardship.  The pattern is easy enough for a beginner and is worked on US size 10 1/2 needles in our Deluxe Bulky Superwash wool.

I’m a sucker for blues and greens, so the five-color version in those tones really speaks to me.  Those who want to go bolder might try the six-color version, shown in purple, pink, and green.  And those who want something classic and understated can knit the three-color version in shades of white and gray.

We’re not kidding when we say the welting pattern on this is easy.  It’s a four row repeat knitted flat which goes: knit a row, purl a row, purl a row, knit a row.  Great for beginners, or for those who want a project to knit that doesn’t require their full attention.  (I still haven’t gotten to see the latest season of Sherlock; this would be ideal for that!)

As I look at this scarf, I also wonder how it would look with a couple of different colors of a self-shading yarn, like Poems Chunky.   I’ve been searching for the perfect project for our newest color.

Hm.  I think my queue just got longer.

Happy knitting!

Free Pattern Friday – Pomtastic Hat and Scarf

It’s Free Pattern Friday!

Today, the Pomtastic Hat and Scarf in Major.

We like this combo for two reasons.

First, it’s a neat example of how to work the same stitch pattern flat or in the round.  Row one is the same on both, but of course when you’re working in the round things are a bit different because you’re never reversing directions.  In row 2, stitches are knitted for the flat back-and-forth of the scarf, but purled in the round for the hat.

The second reason to like this set:

Pom-pom!

It’s pretty cool what you can do with a pom-pom maker and a self-striping yarn like Major.  You can plan out the colors, or just go with the flow.  This little half-and-half topper happened organically.

Plus, let’s face it, what isn’t improved by the addition of pompoms?

C'mon team, play rrrruff!

We rest our case.

Happy knitting!

 

Summit Scarf – Triple Knotted Fringe

The Summit Scarf from our Colorful Commute e-book features triple knotted fringe. It is an easy way to add a lot of visual interest to your project. It may look complicated, but it’s really quite simple and doesn’t take much more time or effort than plain fringe. Today I’ll show you how to do it!

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Step 1: Begin as you normally would when adding fringe to a project, for this scarf I cut 21” strands of yarn. Then, holding two strands together as one, I attached groups of fringe to the edge of the scarf, about one group every other stitch.

Step 2: Take half of one group of fringe knot together with half of next group of fringe 1” below first row of knots. I did not split the first and last groups of fringe.

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Step 3: Repeat for another row of knots. To finish, trim fringe evenly.

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That’s all there is to it! You can keep adding more rows of knots to create some really amazing  and intricate looking fringe, use longer strands of yarn when increasing the number of knotted rows. Beads can be placed above the knots (or even in place of the knots) to add some sparkle – there are so many possibilities.

 

 

Weaving Wednesdays – Herringbone Sampler

I’m pretty excited about this current weaving project. For years now, I’ve wanted to weave my own fabric for a custom-sewn jacket. And finally, I’m going to make it happen. In fact, I’m making two of them! Yonca, our sales director (and my boss) caught wind of my plan and requested a jacket for her own. You be able to find us at next January’s TNNA in our matching jackets.

Years ago, I sewed a moto jacket from this Burda pattern.

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Here I am wearing my version, circa 2009 or so.

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I’ve been wanting to weave with our Deluxe DK Tweed Superwash ever since we introduced it earlier this year, and I decided this would be the perfect project for it. I toyed around with a few ideas for the type of weaving draft I’d use, but in the end I decided on a herringbone tweed. I love the idea of classic herringbone and tweed modernized in the ultra-cool moto jacket.

Before beginning, I knew I need to make a sample of my woven fabric. I mean, if I’m going to be weaving yards upon yards of fabric for two jackets, I need to know I’m going to like it, right? I was also having trouble deciding on colors, and saw this as a perfect example to introduce a little plaid into my tweed and herringbone.

First, I selected five colors from the Deluxe DK palette that I’d been considering:

dw-tweed-906-aegean-web dw-tweed-910-porcelain-web dw-tweed-912-ebony-web dw-tweed-913-smoke-web dw-tweed-914-charcoal-web

Next, I set out to warp my loom with a section in each color. I read that it’s a good idea to use a denser sett (ends per inch) when weaving twill, so that’s what I did. For a DK weight yarn such as Deluxe DK Tweed Superwash, I would normally weave with a 10 dent reed. But for this project, I opted for a 12 dent.

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I’m using a four harness loom which makes weaving twill a breeze. But with if you have a rigid heddle loom, with the use of pick-up sticks this is totally achievable.

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As you can see, my warp has 5 different colors. I also wove with the same 5 colors to see how they all interacted with one another. I found it interesting that the same 2 colors played differently depending in which was warp and which was weft. The color that is the warp (in this particular twill) shows as being more dominant that the weft.

It’s nice to do a “practice” piece of weaving that I’ll actually use and wear!

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The colors that I ultimately selected for my jacket are the two that I would have picked anyway, but I’m so glad I did this exercise. It also gave Yonca a chance to see the different colors so she could make her choice as well.

Stay tuned for more herringbone twill and moto jackets!

 

Free Pattern Friday – Sideline Scarves

It’s Free Pattern Friday!

Just in time for football season (and gift knitting season!), we have the Sideline Scarves. And a photo tutorial!

Each scarf requires 1 ball of Uptown Worsted Spirit Stripes and 1 ball of Uptown Worsted. 1 strand of each yarn is held together throughout the scarf.

Though these scarves look like intarsia, I can assure you there is no manual changing of colors in this project. The vertical striping along this piece is inherent in the yarn print. This project takes advantage of the color changes in the yarn, and employs what we call “intentional color pooling.” The reason for the tutorial below rather than a simple pattern is that the color changes in Spirit Stripes can vary just a bit from skein to skein. With the method below, no matter what the lengths of color are in your particular skein, you can achieve intentional color pooling.

With just a little bit of preparation, you’ll be knitting away in no time!

Here’s how to do it!

When choosing yarn colors, it’s best to pick a color in Uptown Worsted solids that contrasts with the Spirit Stripes. In the tutorial below, I’m using Uptown Worsted 324 Black with Spirit Stripes 517 Arena (red and yellow)

Step 1: Holding both yarns together, cast on 30-40 stitches with a US Size 10 1/2 needle. Make sure that the last cast-on stitch ends right at the end of that particular color section in the Spirit Stripes. This is important because we’re going to be calculating just how many stitches are consumed by each section of color.

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Step 2: Work in K1, P1 Ribbing through the end of the first section of color. Count how many stitches it took to get through this color, and round to the nearest even number. We will call this number of stitches “X.” If you’re as absent-minded as me, write this number down!

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Step 3: Next, work in K1, P1 Ribbing through the second color and count the stitches. You will most likely have to turn the row before you’ve made it through this color – that’s okay, it’s unimportant now. We will call this color “Y.” Y may not be the same number as X, because the color sections are not always exactly the same length.

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Step 4: Unravel your knitting from above. Add X + Y, then divide in half. The resulting number will be your cast on. Your cast on number should be roughly 24-30 stitches.

Step 5: With waste yarn, make a crochet chain that is several stitches longer than your cast on number. Now, holding both yarns together, from the tail end of the yarns, find a color section a few colors from the end. Find the halfway point of this section of color. Be sure to leave at least a yard or so of tail for binding off later.

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Step 6: Beginning at that halfway point in the first color section, working through the bottom bump of each crochet chain, [pick up and knit 1 stitch, pick up and purl 1 stitch] until you’ve run to the end of this color. The number of stitches you were able to pick up should be half of X (or Y). If you picked up more or fewer stitches before reaching the end of the color change, take out a few stitches and adjust tension as needed.

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Step 7: Continuing where you left off in the rib sequence (you may have left off with either a pick up and knit or pick up and purl), pick up stitches in K1, P1 Ribbing until you have run halfway through the second color. This number should be half of X (or Y). If it is not, take out a few stitches and adjust your tension.

The total number of stitches on your needle should be the cast-on number figured in Step 4, or X + Y divided by 2.

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Step 8: Now it’s time for the fun part – the knitting! Turn your work. Work in K1, P1 Ribbing until you reach the end of that color. Your last stitch in this color (shown yellow below) should fall right on top of the first stitch yellow stitch. If it doesn’t, take a few stitches out and adjust your tension.

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Step 9: Continue in K1, P1 Ribbing to the end of the row. You should now be halfway through the second color (shown red below).

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Repeat Steps 8 & 9 until you have about 1 yard of yarn left, enough to bind off.

Here is another version of the scarf, a little further along:

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You can see that the midway point between the colors is not perfect – and that’s okay! Just be sure not to get too far off track with your alignment of the colors, or it will be tougher to correct when you get farther into the scarf.

Pick your team, choose your colors, and get knitting!

Ready for the Big Time? In Transit is here!

It’s here!

E-book In Transit offers 7 knit and crochet accessories in beautiful bulky Classic Shades Big Time.

Looking for some quick gifts to knock out?  Want a little distraction from the holidays – or from real life?  We’ve got you covered.  The new e-book In Transit features 7 fabulous accessories to knit and crochet, all in bulky, beautiful Classic Shades Big Time (150yds/85g).

Designed by Amy Gunderson and Tori Gurbisz, they’re all achievable by the intermediate or newer crafter, and they all go quickly on big needles or hooks.  All patterns are available on Ravelry as a set in the In Transit e-book, or individually.  Check out the gallery – and enjoy!