Category Archives: Pattern

Free Pattern Friday – Frog Hoodie

It’s Free Pattern Friday!

Bella Chenille Frog Hoodie wide blog

Today, a great project to leap into the new year with.  The Frog Hoodie in Bella Chenille!

Bella Chenille (131yds/100g) is a fuzzy polyester chenille that’s very soft and easy to work with.  I used this for a Sunday Swatch a while back, and I can tell you from firsthand experience that it machine washes well.  This is a great yarn choice for a kid project.

Knit the sleeves in the round and put them aside, then work the body and attach the sleeves.  Work upward to the neck and hood, then add the frog eyes.  The coordinating buttons are nice and big for little hands to fasten.

Happy knitting!

 

Throwback Thursday – Felted Polar Bear

It’s Throwback Thursday!

TT_Felted Polar Bear_Deluxe Worsted_blogToday, the Felted Polar Bear by Michele Wilcox.

We were inspired to release today’s pattern by a note in Vogue Knitting’s latest KnitNews e-mail.  They polled the staff to see what they were gift knitting, and one responded, “I’m hurriedly knitting a toy with Universal Yarn’s Deluxe Worsted wool, for a new baby in my family—he was adopted, so I didn’t have much notice!”

That combined with the adorable knitted cat in Cotton Supreme Batik that a customer sent to us via Facebook got us thinking about stuffed animals.  And as usual, Michele Wilcox comes through!

The Felted Polar Bear was originally part of a pattern collection for Shepherd’s Own, which is now discontinued.  However, it looks perfect in Deluxe Worsted color 40001, Cream Undyed Natural.  There are a number of undyed Deluxe Worsted Natural colors that would work if you wanted a traditional teddy rather than a polar bear.

This bear is made in pieces and stitched together, then lightly felted to make it a little more fuzzy and snuggly.  Sew on an appropriately adorable expression and stuff it, and you have a squeezable friend to cozy up to.  Too cute.

We wish you beary happy knitting!

 

Free Pattern Friday – Insulate Cardigan

It’s Free Pattern Friday!

Insulate Cardigan_blogToday, the Insulate Cardigan in Superwool.

Insulate Cardigan back blogYesterday on the blog we were talking about how slowly knitting could go with tiny needles and tiny yarn.  This, on the other hand, could not go faster.  The cardigan is actually knit as one rectangle.  That’s it.  Knits and purls, worked straight from end to end, then folded and seamed, creating this neat swallowtail hem.  If you’re looking for a quick and easy project, we’ve got you covered.

Insulate Cardigan mannequin_blogSuperwool (100g/66yds) is a super-bulky, springy wool blend that stretches and moves with you.  This is a great project to wrap yourself up in, nice and cozy.

Our sales manager Yonca designed and knitted this cardigan, and we passed it around the office modeling it.  Our accounting manager tried it on upside down, and guess what – it still looked great!  Here it is “upside down” on a mannequin.  Pretty versatile for one long rectangle.

Happy knitting!

 

 

Throwback Thursday – Knitted Motor Scarf

It’s Throwback Thursday!

TT Motor Scarf

Today, we’re throwing way back.  A century back.  Let’s look at the Knitted Motor Scarf from 1909.

I love to look at old craft magazines for inspiration.  This week, I turned to a special Christmas edition of the December 1909 Woman’s Home Companion and decided to try one of their gift suggestions.

Womens Home Companion Dec 1909 Gifts
Hey, $1.75 for a pair of shoes is a really good deal.

The photos aren’t that great, what with it being near the dawn of the 20th century, so it’s hard to see exactly what’s the finished objects look like.  But smack in the middle of the page is a picture of “A Knitted Motor Scarf for the Man With an Automobile.”  Well, I know a man with an automobile, so that sounds like a winner to me.

First obstacle in the pattern: “made of motor silk in a medium shade of gray.”  I have no idea what motor silk is, and for once Google has failed me.  If any of you know what motor silk is, please write in.  I’m dying to find out.

However, what I do have is Saki Bamboo (230yds/50g).  This is a blend of superwash wool, nylon, and rayon from bamboo.  The bamboo should provide a good silky sheen and the nylon will give the durability that my giftee will need when he’s out on the open road in his Model T.  I’m always happy to have a chance to knit with Saki Bamboo – it’s very smooth and even, and has a medium gray (Color 211 Steel Grey) that should fit the bill nicely.

Second obstacle: “worked loosely with a pair of No. 12 steel knitting- needles, or for a tight knitter, a pair of fine bone knitting-needles.”  Here, the internet does not fail me.  Fibergypsy’s site says that No. 12 needles back then would translate to 2.25mm/US Size 1 needles today.  Great, perfect for my Saki Bamboo!  There’s no gauge given, but I decided to cast on and hope for the best.

So I started to knit.  And knit.  And knit.  Actually, I’m quite enjoying this pattern, but… it’s 60 stitches wide on tiny needles.  How the heck was someone receiving this magazine in winter supposed to obtain motor silk (?) and find time to knit this before Christmas?  Don’t get me wrong, this is a good pattern, but given all the other knitting I have to do, I probably will not be polishing this off in the next 21 days.

Motor Scarf with page blog

Nonetheless, it’s rather elegant and quite easy!  The dice pattern is fully reversible, an excellent choice for a scarf.  So we’ve written it up in modern terms and shared it, along with the original version.  Please enjoy the Knitted Motor Scarf by Helen Marvin from the December 1909 Woman’s Home Companion.  The magazine was originally 15 cents, but the pattern is free to you.

Happy knitting!

Holiday Helper – December is here!

 

CS Metallic Holiday Swatch blog

How’s the holiday knitting going?  I’m doing better than expected – I found this glittering little gem on our shelves here yesterday and am happily knitting a quick one-ball scarf.  The yarn is Classic Shades Metallic (175yds/100g) and the color is 607 Zenith.  When I saw the red and green accented by silver, I knew it would make the perfect holiday project.  This scarf couldn’t be any more Christmasy unless Santa Claus himself knitted it using two candy canes.

Classic Shades Aina Tonjes shawlThe pattern is a scaled-down version of this free three-ball Classic Shades Shawl pattern by Olga Tonjes.  She also provides instructions for working just one section (as I’m doing in the picture above), making this a great project to adapt if you’re really backed up on your holiday knitting.

Classic Shades Metallic is interchangeable with customer favorite Classic Shades, but with an extra strand of glitter running through it, making it perfect for gifts that you really want to stand out.

I’ve got another couple of balls of Classic Shades Metallic sitting beside me right now – this scarf is going quickly, and I’ll definitely have time to knock out another gift.  This time, I think I’ll work up the Longways Linen Scarf.  On size 9 needles with a basic two row pattern repeat, it ought to go quickly.  I’ll make it through the holidays yet!

Here’s hoping your days are merry and bright.  Happy knitting!

 

 

Free Pattern Friday – Ellery Reversible Cowl

It’s Free Pattern Friday!

Llamalini Ellery Cowl_blog

Today, the Ellery Reversible Cowl in Llamalini silk/linen/royal llama blend (50g/109yds).

This yarn is a favorite around the office for its lovely heathering and soft feel.  The blend of luxury fibers gives it a rich depth.  And it’s well suited to this design, which I love for many reasons – not the least because it’s reversible.

Llamalini Ellery Cowl wrapped blogWhat look like cables are really faux-cables.  No cable needle required.  Wear it long or wrap it for warmth – Llamalini is quite toasty!

We hope you craft something luxurious and wonderful this holiday.  Whether it’s for you or someone else, the process itself is such a joy.

Happy knitting!

Throwback Thursday – Jolly St. Nick

It’s Throwback Thursday!

TT_Jolly St Nick

I’m home celebrating Thanksgiving with my family, but couldn’t resist sharing this little guy – especially after we promised the crocheters last week!

Jolly St. Nick is a crochet version of Santa from Michele Wilcox, the Queen of Cute.  He stands 18″ high including hat – if you’ve seen an American Girl-style doll, that’s about the same height.  Just as with last week’s knit Santa, we’re recommending Uptown Worsted.  The 100% anti-pilling acrylic stands up to a lot of beard-pulling and snuggles.

Start at the top of his head and work down, then go back and add all the details that make him so adorable.  Any pattern that instructs you to embroider a smile is a keeper.

We hope you’re having a wonderful Thanksgiving.  This year, as every year, I am grateful for the ability to create, and in so doing to bring joy to myself and others.  And always, always, there is gratitude for the community of fellow crafters who enrich our lives.  What are you thankful for this year?

All the best this holiday.